Sunday, 21 December 2008

Turning the Hull



Another few weekends have passed and we had thought planking the hull was completed. Neither of us is happy with the sheer planks, stupidly glued up in a rush and the end of a long day. More haste ............... When we turned the hull over we found these two top planks are away from several the moulds and in a couple of places have developed a fold, as they have been forced around the compound curves. The next available weekend will see us cutting away several days’ hard work and trying again. Frustrating, especially when other priorities are preventing us from getting straight on with sorting this out and moving forward.





Turning the hull, finally get to see the inside.

4 comments:

Strathkanchris said...

Good to see the progress, I had begun to wonder - It is really satisfying when you get that far isn't it, feels like you're almost there, don't be fooled. The fitting out will take more time than you will believe!

The problem sheerstrake, sad but put it down to experience. Having been in a similar predicament might I suggest a Hot Air gun to remove the offending strake. You can melt set epoxy pretty effectively with one and scrape the gunge off the laps whilst still hot very easily. Saves a lot of elbow grease and risk of slipped tools. Watch out for scorching, keep the gun moving and it will all pull apart. You might also be able to rescue the strake to reapply when concentration is better.
Full marks for getting so far in this exceptionally adverse winter.

Chris

Sailing Widow Wife said...

Good to see it taking shape!

Jonathan said...

Thanks for the encouragement Chris, we will get there! Yes we’re prepared for the work involved with fitting out, but equally are ready for a change from planking. Also thanks for the suggestion of the hot air gun, which I’m going to try.
I was going to pick your brains on deck material as I see Iain is specifying 2-3 mm. I then noticed in one of your postings that you used 4mm on your Mac (which at the moment is also my plan). Although I can get 3mm in lower spec marine plywood, I want to stick to the Super-Elite and Robbins start this at 4mm. Do you have any comments on this, or other supply contacts?
The whole drawing thing is a bit frustrating. Fully respect Iain for being digital free, but why don’t WoodenBoat distribute his latest version? Apparently at present, WB provides Iain with a list of buyers of plans, that’s how apparently I received some mail directly from him. Your role in catching would be builders, in time to inform them of this, is certainly a worthwhile one as the later drawings have so much more detail.
Jonathan

Strathkanchris said...

Deck - the elite 3mm is a good deck ply, I recently used it on the Wood Duck 12 build. It comprises three pretty well even veneers unlike the 4mm, the last batch of which is not brilliant, one heavy core veneer with very thin exterior layers. On 'Scotch Mist' I used the 4mm Tiger Elite, slightly lighter weight than the super elite, much the same cost though. I was after a particular look for my boat - after all they do spend far more time ashore being looked at than on water. The 3mm elite won't have the good looks of the super elite and is rather flexible so if you sat on the deck it might give a little. I don't think it would give way, it might be disconcerting to the sitter though.
As far as Iain and the digital age is concerned - since he is even longer in the tooth than I it seems reasonable to presume he can't be faffed with learning new tricks. I still find some aspects of electronic communication unsettling - having a conversation by email with somebody on the other side of the world eleven hours ahead of me. There's me running down after supper and he is bright and breezy just having breakfast. Weird.
Thanks for the appreciatiative note re pointing out the existance of reworked drawings - It certainly seems a roundabout way Woodenboat have of dealing with it.
Does the reworked deck structure have a King beam? The old one doesn't and it made for a problem or two in getting a good curve.
Chris